More Cold Dogs

Those European artists who managed to get out in the cold snow and ice back in the 16-th, 17-th, 18-th and 19-th centuries and capture the scenery, the life of the people, and the austere conditions have my greatest admiration.  Especially because they managed to show dogs quite often.  Maybe even some of my ancestors! Or maybe not.  In any case, today I bring you seven wonderful images, showing Holland, Belgium, and England in the Winter, long ago.

Enjoy, and don’t forget to click on the images  so you can see the details, especially the dogs.

First, “View on the Heergracht at the Amstel”, by Dutch painter, Springer Cornelis (1817-1891)

View on the Heergracht at the Amstel -- Springer Cornelis (1817-1891)

View on the Heergracht at the Amstel -- Springer Cornelis (1817-1891)

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Next,  “On the way to market” by British painter, Thomas Smythe (1825-1906).

On the way to market--Thomas Smythe (1825-1906)

On the way to market--Thomas Smythe (1825-1906)

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Now comes a frozen canal near castle, by Dutch painter, Andreas Schelfhout (1787-1870).

Frozen canal near castle--Andreas Schelfhout (1787-1870)

Frozen canal near castle--Andreas Schelfhout (1787-1870)

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And another winter scene by Belgian painter, Albert Moerman (1808 – 1856).

Winter Landscape--Albert Moerman (1808 - 1856)

Winter Landscape--Albert Moerman (1808 - 1856)

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Here is another scene showing 19th century winter in Holland, by Dutch painter, Bart van Hove (1856-1914).

Pompenburg met Hofpoort in Winter--Bart van Hove (1856-1914)

Pompenburg met Hofpoort in Winter--Bart van Hove (1856-1914)

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Next, a 17th century winter scene by Flemish Baroque era painter, Jan Abrahamsz Beerstraten (ca.1627-1666).  Those dogs look cold.

Post House and the New Bridge--Jan Abrahamsz Beerstraten (ca. 1627-1666)

Post House and the New Bridge--Jan Abrahamsz Beerstraten (ca. 1627-1666)

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Last for today, “Country Folk in a Frozen Winter Landscape”  by Dutch painter, Wouterus Verschuur ( 1812-1874).

Country Folk in a Frozen Winter Landscape--Wouterus Verschuur (1812-1874)

Country Folk in a Frozen Winter Landscape--Wouterus Verschuur (1812-1874)

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Well, I hope you liked them, and clicked on at least a few so to see how cold dogs survived in the tough old days.  To me it looks like it was colder back then.

Your best friend,

Rita the dog.

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4 Responses to “More Cold Dogs”

  1. EKB Says:

    Hi, Rita,
    These are lovely paintings. I’m glad you enjoy them! I wonder what you would think of snow since you’ve never gotten to run in it. If there’s snow on Cofre sometime, we’ll bring you up there, and maybe your siblings, too.

    Hope you are recovering from your very, very long walk with dad and Cosi and Happy and Giaco yesterday. Dad said you and Cosi did the best even though you are by far the oldest!

    I’m looking forward to your next post. Maybe I’ll bring you some pictures of dog in snow from Boston when I go in a couple of weeks.

  2. rita314 Says:

    Oh no! You’re leaving in a couple of weeks. I sure will miss you.
    Thanks for that comment.
    Love, Rita

  3. Bo Hyttner Says:

    Dear Sirs, Sterling is a record label based in Stockholm, Sweden. We specialize in orchestral romantic music. We have already released two symphonies by Bernard Zweers, the great Dutch romantic.
    We are soon to release also the 3rd symphony by this truly great master.
    We may have found a suitable painting in your possession by Cornelis Springer, Heergracht an der Amstel.
    Could we, please, somehow obtain the rights to have this painting on the CD front?
    Please let me know as soon as possible. We may be able to give a symbolic amount for the usage,
    I look forward to hear from you soonest, and we thank you in advance,
    all the very best
    Bo Hyttner
    Sterling Manager

    • rita314 Says:

      Dear Bo Hyttner. I think all art should be free for everyone.
      Alas, I own neither the painting nor the rights. Several copies of this painting are on the internet. “Sundance” uploaded a high resolution version to usenet several years ago. Maybe your lawyers can make a good case that this 19th century image is in the public domain. Good luck!
      Rita the dog

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