Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009)

The time has come to praise Andrew Wyeth, for he died today at the age of 91.  His paintings of rural Pennsylvania and Maine,  highly detailed, realistic, stark, even melancholy are well known.

Andrew Wyeth in 1964

Andrew Wyeth in 1964 (from news release)

Andrew Wyeth (recent photo, ©2008 Jim Graham)

Andrew Wyeth (recent photo, ©2008 Jim Graham)

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So, in his honor I will share some images of the work of Andrew Wyeth, a few with dogs. First, a detail from the very famous Christina’s World, 1948.

Christina's World (detail) - Andrew Wyeth - 1948

Christina's World (detail) - Andrew Wyeth - 1948

For the full picture (but not high resolution), and information about it and the woman in it see this link to The Museum of Modern Art.

Next comes another well known image, dating to 1979 and called ‘Sauna’.

Andrew Wyeth - Sauna - 1979

Andrew Wyeth - Sauna - 1979

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Next comes a painting I like because it reminds me of some of the wonderful walks my mom and dad take me and the interlopers on, near Xico, here in Mexico where we live.

Andrew Wyeth - The Intruder - 1971

Andrew Wyeth - The Intruder - 1971

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Next comes a copyrighted image, so it is to view as a bit of art education, but not to be downloaded.  It dates to 1981 and is called “Lovers”

Andrew Wyeth - Lovers - 1981 (copyrighted)

Andrew Wyeth - Lovers - 1981 (copyrighted)

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Next is one I like a lot.  That’s really a lucky dog.  Sometimes I’m lucky like that.  Those are good days.

Andrew Wyeth - Master Bedroom - 1965 (watercolor)

Andrew Wyeth - Master Bedroom - 1965 (watercolor)

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Here is an older picture called “Wind from the Sea” that I like a lot:

Andrew Wyeth - Wind from the Sea - 1948

Andrew Wyeth - Wind from the Sea - 1948

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The next painting is called “Raccoon” but I don’t see any raccoons.  All I see is 2 ½ dogs that probably hunt raccoons.  Maybe the dog that’s only half a dog whose really pulling his chain hard had a raccoon in his mouth, but the canvass just wasn’t big enough to include it.  Seems strange to me but I’m just a dog so maybe you humans who read this can explain it.  Anyway its a pretty nice picture of the dogs that made it all the way in.

Andrew Wyeth - Raccoon - 1958

Andrew Wyeth - Raccoon - 1958

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Last, here is a picture with a wild dog in it.

Andrew Wyeth - Wild Dog (study for groundhog day) - 1959

Andrew Wyeth - Wild Dog (study for groundhog day) - 1959

I bet that was a tough dog to make it through the winter with no chance for a warm bed like that other dog.  The world is not really fair, and lots of it is just luck.

Anyway, I hope you liked this selection from the works of Andrew Wyeth, may he rest in peace.

Yours,

Rita the dog

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10 Responses to “Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009)”

  1. Tina Duryea Says:

    Great post. Wyeth was one of my inspirations. I once got the opportunity to see “Intruder” in person and by myself…it is a strangely powerful painting in real life. He will be missed.

  2. Moira Says:

    Hi Rita – I think it is beautiful how you combined Wyeth’s dog work with his non-nog work. Really lovely. I had never seen the last two works you featured. I wanted to make sure you saw this other dog painting called “Ides of March” too….

    http://dreamdogsart.typepad.com/art/2009/01/andrew-wyeth-dies-at-91.html

  3. rita314 Says:

    Thanks Tina and Moira. I appreciate your comments. The “Ides of March” picture is very nice and I had not seen it before.

    Rita

  4. Doug Says:

    As told to me by an art dealer in the Brandywine area of Pa., upon purchasing this Wyeth piece, these hunting dogs were Andrew’s “neighbors”. Their owner starved them to make them more voracious hunters and Andrew would sneak over to his property and quietly feed them as he felt sorry for them and their pitiful existence…..chained and unfed. He ‘snapped’ some pix one time and decided to honor them in oil.

    • Doug Bulcher Says:

      I am another Doug, coincidentally, and yes….you are correct. The dogs were starved and Wyeth would sneak down to feed them. We own this print and have loved it for many years.

  5. rita314 Says:

    Thanks for that tidbit, Doug. Very interesting.

  6. Kate Says:

    Hi, Raccoon has an interesting and ultimately, sad story….if you get a chance, listen to an audio narration about Wyeth’s experience painting these dogs and what he tried to do later on…

  7. Richard Sund Says:

    Hi Rita: I live near Chadds Ford.I love this painting, have seen it in person many times.According to Andrew Wyeth,these were raccoon-hunting dogs of his neighbors.Andrew wanted to adopt the one with the chain around its neck.But,when he returned from Maine, the neighbor had killed the dogs because they were “old”.As with many titles, Wyeth often leaves something out–in this case,raccoons. Actually, the dogs became the “hunted” by their owner’s own hand.This is a large amazing tempera that is one of my very favorites.

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