Posts Tagged ‘dog art’

Queen Elizabeth Loves Dogs

June 2, 2012

I don’t know much about her royal highness but I do know that she loves dogs, and that’s enough for me.  Can there be any doubt:

Princess Elizabeth at 10-years-old in 1936 with her first corgi

Princess Elizabeth at 10-years-old in 1936 with her first corgi

Here she is looking really happy five years later in 1941:

Queen Elizabeth II as a young Princess, with dog -- 1941

Queen Elizabeth II as a young Princess, with dog — 1941

I have no idea when this next photo was taken, but it is cute:

Princess Elizabeth with dog

Princess Elizabeth with dog

She favors a breed, which you see even in the pictures above, called a Welsh Corgi.  They look like this:

Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Pretty cute I’d say.  But maybe not as cute as the queen herself who looked like this back in 1952 when she became the queen, which event my old man says he actually remembers:

Queen Elizabeth ii--photo by--Drothy Wilding

Queen Elizabeth ii–photo by–Drothy Wilding

Since I love dog art, I dug around the net a bit and found that maybe the dog loving thing is in her genes:

van Dyck--The Three Eldest Children of Charles I--1635

van Dyck–The Three Eldest Children of Charles I–1635

And more recently this painting which shows Queen Victoria and Prince Albert in the early years of their marriage, and more importantly with some of their dogs:

Landseer’s ‘Windsor Castle in Modern Times’

Landseer’s ‘Windsor Castle in Modern Times’

If you’re interested in more historical royal dogs look here, where some of these images came from (thank you!).

And a painting of the young princess in 1933 at age 7, unfortunately without dogs:

Philip Alexius de Laszlo--Princess Elizabeth of York--Currently Queen Elizabeth II of England--1933

Philip Alexius de Laszlo–Princess Elizabeth of York–Currently Queen Elizabeth II of England–1933

Born April 21, 1926 the queen is now 86 years old.  Here is a picture (from Wikipedia) taken 5 years ago:

Queen Elizabeth II in 2007

Queen Elizabeth II in 2007

I hate fanfare, but maybe the queen likes it.  In any case, as you probably know, a huge fanfare called the Diamond Jubilee celebrating her 60 years as Queen of England is this year, and some of the big stuff is about to start right about now, including horse races and I don’t know what all, but (and I’m not sure I like this) at least one dog thing:

Rhodesian Ridgeback preparing for Diamond Jubilee

Rhodesian Ridgeback preparing for Diamond Jubilee

Seems like they could have had a Corgi or at least a Dorgi, the ‘breed’ the queen herself created as a cross between a Dachshund and a Corgi, apparently with a brick as height adjuster :).

Have a nice day, yours,

Rita the dog [ignore video add, if any, just below]

P.S. I found another dog blogger who wrote about the queen:  here.

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Bulldog with women

May 11, 2012

I suppose images of naked bulldogs with women are common.  Still you have to wonder if Mr. Helmut Newton (my previous post) knew about this painting of Francis Picabia:

Francis Picabia--Bulldog with women--1941-1942

Francis Picabia–Bulldog with women–1941-1942

Not that it matters,  but I was struck by the similarity of the subject matter.  Francis Picabia (French 1879 – 1953) was a pretty interesting fellow, being associated with both the Dada and Surrealist movements, certainly belied by the image above.  For more information about him check the link above (first mention of  his name).

Have a nice day,

Rita the dog  [ignore video ad, if any, immediately below]

The Polka Dot Queen

May 8, 2012

Her name is Yayoi Kusama and if she didn’t invent polka dots she may as well have. Sample art:

Japanese artist:  YAYOI KUSAMA--dotted pumpkin--2010

YAYOI KUSAMA–dotted pumpkin–2010

Born in 1929 she ain’t no spring chicken.  If she were, my sister Cosi would definitely be chasing after her.

I think she liked nudity and installations, for example:

Image

You might not think she is a dog artist, but she is, at the TATE no less:

Yayoi Kusama -- Polka Dot Dog 1

Yayoi Kusama — Polka Dot Dog 1 — At TATE

And here is another:

Another Yayoi Kusama dog

Another Yayoi Kusama dog 

Now here is the thing that makes me know she is not your everyday customer:  She offered to sleep with Richard Nixon if he would end the Vietnam war!

Bet you didn’t know that.

Your best friend,

Rita the dog [ignore video ad, if any, immediately below]

Back from the dead

May 7, 2012

Well, not dead but for 3 years blissfully retired from blogging.  In dog-years that is about 20 of your human years, which has allowed me to get old and deaf, but fortunately neither decrepit nor too senile (I hope) to give it another shot.  There will be this change:  less text, more pictures, and no restrictions to dog art.  Of course dogs and art will be a common topic, but for me blogging is work, and if I must work it has to be something I like, which simply means I will blog about whatever strikes my fancy at the moment.

First off, there is this ambiguity of the phrase “dog art” which is usually parsed as art made by humans in which dogs are the subject of the art, or perhaps just are there tangentially in the artwork.  I wanted to call your attention to an alternate parsing of that phrase:  art created by dogs.  Lest you think that this is yet another ramble about the null-set, let me call your attention to a dog named “TILLAMOOK CHEDDAR”  who is a real artist.  Back in the year 2000 she looked like this:

tillie in year 2000

Tillie — a real dog artist (c. 2000)

Maybe she has expired or just gotten old like me (I’m now 14 years old) but up at least till 2010 Tillie was still an active artist.  From her website  “Widely regarded as the world’s preeminent canine artist, she has had twenty solo exhibitions in the U.S. and Europe”.

I say:  hang in there Tillie, and keep on doing art!

Have a great day,

Rita the dog   [ignore video ad, if any, immediately below]

Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009)

January 17, 2009

The time has come to praise Andrew Wyeth, for he died today at the age of 91.  His paintings of rural Pennsylvania and Maine,  highly detailed, realistic, stark, even melancholy are well known.

Andrew Wyeth in 1964

Andrew Wyeth in 1964 (from news release)

Andrew Wyeth (recent photo, ©2008 Jim Graham)

Andrew Wyeth (recent photo, ©2008 Jim Graham)

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So, in his honor I will share some images of the work of Andrew Wyeth, a few with dogs. First, a detail from the very famous Christina’s World, 1948.

Christina's World (detail) - Andrew Wyeth - 1948

Christina's World (detail) - Andrew Wyeth - 1948

For the full picture (but not high resolution), and information about it and the woman in it see this link to The Museum of Modern Art.

Next comes another well known image, dating to 1979 and called ‘Sauna’.

Andrew Wyeth - Sauna - 1979

Andrew Wyeth - Sauna - 1979

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Next comes a painting I like because it reminds me of some of the wonderful walks my mom and dad take me and the interlopers on, near Xico, here in Mexico where we live.

Andrew Wyeth - The Intruder - 1971

Andrew Wyeth - The Intruder - 1971

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Next comes a copyrighted image, so it is to view as a bit of art education, but not to be downloaded.  It dates to 1981 and is called “Lovers”

Andrew Wyeth - Lovers - 1981 (copyrighted)

Andrew Wyeth - Lovers - 1981 (copyrighted)

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Next is one I like a lot.  That’s really a lucky dog.  Sometimes I’m lucky like that.  Those are good days.

Andrew Wyeth - Master Bedroom - 1965 (watercolor)

Andrew Wyeth - Master Bedroom - 1965 (watercolor)

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Here is an older picture called “Wind from the Sea” that I like a lot:

Andrew Wyeth - Wind from the Sea - 1948

Andrew Wyeth - Wind from the Sea - 1948

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The next painting is called “Raccoon” but I don’t see any raccoons.  All I see is 2 ½ dogs that probably hunt raccoons.  Maybe the dog that’s only half a dog whose really pulling his chain hard had a raccoon in his mouth, but the canvass just wasn’t big enough to include it.  Seems strange to me but I’m just a dog so maybe you humans who read this can explain it.  Anyway its a pretty nice picture of the dogs that made it all the way in.

Andrew Wyeth - Raccoon - 1958

Andrew Wyeth - Raccoon - 1958

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Last, here is a picture with a wild dog in it.

Andrew Wyeth - Wild Dog (study for groundhog day) - 1959

Andrew Wyeth - Wild Dog (study for groundhog day) - 1959

I bet that was a tough dog to make it through the winter with no chance for a warm bed like that other dog.  The world is not really fair, and lots of it is just luck.

Anyway, I hope you liked this selection from the works of Andrew Wyeth, may he rest in peace.

Yours,

Rita the dog

More Cold Dogs

January 11, 2009

Those European artists who managed to get out in the cold snow and ice back in the 16-th, 17-th, 18-th and 19-th centuries and capture the scenery, the life of the people, and the austere conditions have my greatest admiration.  Especially because they managed to show dogs quite often.  Maybe even some of my ancestors! Or maybe not.  In any case, today I bring you seven wonderful images, showing Holland, Belgium, and England in the Winter, long ago.

Enjoy, and don’t forget to click on the images  so you can see the details, especially the dogs.

First, “View on the Heergracht at the Amstel”, by Dutch painter, Springer Cornelis (1817-1891)

View on the Heergracht at the Amstel -- Springer Cornelis (1817-1891)

View on the Heergracht at the Amstel -- Springer Cornelis (1817-1891)

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Next,  “On the way to market” by British painter, Thomas Smythe (1825-1906).

On the way to market--Thomas Smythe (1825-1906)

On the way to market--Thomas Smythe (1825-1906)

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Now comes a frozen canal near castle, by Dutch painter, Andreas Schelfhout (1787-1870).

Frozen canal near castle--Andreas Schelfhout (1787-1870)

Frozen canal near castle--Andreas Schelfhout (1787-1870)

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And another winter scene by Belgian painter, Albert Moerman (1808 – 1856).

Winter Landscape--Albert Moerman (1808 - 1856)

Winter Landscape--Albert Moerman (1808 - 1856)

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Here is another scene showing 19th century winter in Holland, by Dutch painter, Bart van Hove (1856-1914).

Pompenburg met Hofpoort in Winter--Bart van Hove (1856-1914)

Pompenburg met Hofpoort in Winter--Bart van Hove (1856-1914)

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Next, a 17th century winter scene by Flemish Baroque era painter, Jan Abrahamsz Beerstraten (ca.1627-1666).  Those dogs look cold.

Post House and the New Bridge--Jan Abrahamsz Beerstraten (ca. 1627-1666)

Post House and the New Bridge--Jan Abrahamsz Beerstraten (ca. 1627-1666)

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Last for today, “Country Folk in a Frozen Winter Landscape”  by Dutch painter, Wouterus Verschuur ( 1812-1874).

Country Folk in a Frozen Winter Landscape--Wouterus Verschuur (1812-1874)

Country Folk in a Frozen Winter Landscape--Wouterus Verschuur (1812-1874)

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Well, I hope you liked them, and clicked on at least a few so to see how cold dogs survived in the tough old days.  To me it looks like it was colder back then.

Your best friend,

Rita the dog.

Cold Dogs

January 4, 2009

There weren’t that many firecrackers and bombs exploding in the air this year.  I crawled under the table as close to my Dad’s feet as possible.  He kept thinking I would knock him off-line because I had to step over the surge protector with the switch on top, but I was careful.  Old dogs are wiser, no New Year’s resolutions for me.  Sure way to feel guilty and bad.  Its cold this time of year, but walks and lying in the sun, when there is sun, helps some.

So I thought you might like to see some art which features cold dogs.  Yeah, I know, this means I’ll have to do hot dogs sometime, to keep things balanced.  Obligations weigh heavy.

Let’s start with a famous one, by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, called “The Hunters in the Snow (Winter)” which dates back to 1565.

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, called "The Hunters in the Snow (Winter)" which dates back to 1565.

Click on image to see it better (and bigger).  I’ll bet those dogs had cold feet.

Next, an ice skating  scene in Holland, dating to the 19th century, by the Dutch landscape artist Andreas Schelfhout, who specialized in winter landscapes.

Andreas Schelfhout (1787-1870) -- Ice Merriment Near a Mill

Andreas Schelfhout (1787-1870) -- Ice Merriment Near a Mill

Click on the image to see those cold merry folks a little larger, and of course, the dog.

Last, a very sad dog standing over the open grave of his one true love–how will he survive now that his mistress has past away?  This is by Swedish artist Carl Stefan Bennet (1800-1878).

Carl Stefan Bennet (1800-1878) -- Fidele

Carl Stefan Bennet (1800-1878) ~ Fidele

Please click image to see it better.  I have many more cold dogs in winter images.  Speak up if you would like to see more.

Vicious Attack

December 5, 2008

Yesterday was a bad day.  Maybe it was day before.  The days tend to run together when you’re an older dog.  My younger sister Cosi, who is both strong and pretty, sweet and vicious, attacked me without provocation.  I was like the little white dog in this 1924 illustration by Gustaf Tenggren, in “The Good Dog Book”

Gustaf Tenggren--from The Good Dog Book--1924

Gustaf Tenggren--from The Good Dog Book--1924

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I didn’t do anything, she just attacked.  She is so deceptively sweet.  She looks just like this:

Dream-runner-Stella Looks just like Cosi

Dream-runner-Stella Looks just like Cosi

(This wonderful picture taken from a post called “Dream Runner”in a blog called “Dog Virgin Diaries“)

Check out those teeth and those strong jaws.  Not sweet digging into your flesh.  Well I was lucky because my mom was right there to save me.  Ever since I try to get under my daddys legs for safety — or hide in the ‘green room’ which is my parents easy-speak for the back poarch/storeroom.  My dad isn’t too happy that his beloved books are relegated to the dog-overflow room.  But that’s the way it is and we all have to accept some things we’d rather not.

Things could be worse.  The good old days were no better.  Check this out from 1898 where they shot dogs with bows and arrows for sport.  Michael Vick don’t get any ideas.

Archery with the Yumi Shooting a Dog -- Chikanobu--1898

Archery with the Yumi Shooting a Dog -- Chikanobu--1898

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This blogging software is frustrating me today, so let me end with a new take on a red dog, like me.  Here it is:

Georg Grosz--Suicide--1916

Georg Grosz--Suicide--1916

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George Grosz (1893-1959) was a German artist, whose art was often critical of the Germany of his day.  He was drafted into the German army in 1914 and after his experiences in the trenches developed a  loathing for German society  savagely reflected as satirical paintings and drawings that in his words expressed ‘despair, hate and disillusionment’.  This painting is surely no exception, for we see a dead body, a prostitute, and dogs roaming around the scene.

With a little luck, and if Cosi, my sister,  stays at bay, my next post may be more upbeat.

Have a good day.

Rita the dog

Schuler and Brazier

December 2, 2008

Today for your viewing pleasure and contemplation I bring you Earl Schuler’s poster, “Report Dog Bites”, commissioned in 1941 by the Cleveland Healt Department.  Here it is:

Report Dog Bites -- Earl Schuler -- 1941

Report Dog Bites -- Earl Schuler -- 1941

And, switching gears, a modern work of London based artist Richard Brazier.  This piece is at the National Portrait Gallery London.

Johnny and Glory -- Richard Brazier

Johnny and Glory -- Richard Brazier

I think this piece is from 2007 or 2008 but really I am just guessing.  Let me know if you have a date for it.

Keep on treking,

Rita the dog

Falling off the Wagon

November 20, 2008

Five months is a long time on the wagon.  There was no doubt I was an addict.  Any dog who spends upwards of 5 hours a day on the Internet is an addict.  Funny thing was, climbing on that wagon was nothing.  I just woke up one day with a total Internet aversion.  Even the idea of it made me nauseous.  Course the carbuncle I had on my tail was part of it.  Hurt every time I sat on the stool and tried my snagle-claw hunt and peck at the keyboard.  My dad wanted to take a picture of it.  What kind of taste is that.  No way.  A lady who seems real nice wants to see video of me at the keyboard.  Oh ye of little faith.  So I had a tail operation and here I am five months later rearing and ready to go — but not without guilt for slipping so smoothly off that bumpy wagon.

I have to admit that I have had a short spell answering questions over on Yahoo!Answers.  Some guy thought my avatar looked like a red bear.  And a lady said I should see a shrink, and the sooner the better.  I’m not sure she even believed I was a dog.  No dog-shrinks around here anyway.

So here it is, a few dog art treats for you today.  Sorry, I can’t remember where they came from.

1872 expression

1872 expression

1872 expression, pic 2

1872 expression, pic 2

1872 expression, pic 3

1872 expression, pic 3

1872 expression, pic 4

1872 expression, pic 4

1872 expression, pic 5

1872 expression, pic 5

That’s it for today.  Welcome back to my blog.

Your best friend,

Rita the dog