Archive for January, 2009

Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009)

January 17, 2009

The time has come to praise Andrew Wyeth, for he died today at the age of 91.  His paintings of rural Pennsylvania and Maine,  highly detailed, realistic, stark, even melancholy are well known.

Andrew Wyeth in 1964

Andrew Wyeth in 1964 (from news release)

Andrew Wyeth (recent photo, ©2008 Jim Graham)

Andrew Wyeth (recent photo, ©2008 Jim Graham)

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So, in his honor I will share some images of the work of Andrew Wyeth, a few with dogs. First, a detail from the very famous Christina’s World, 1948.

Christina's World (detail) - Andrew Wyeth - 1948

Christina's World (detail) - Andrew Wyeth - 1948

For the full picture (but not high resolution), and information about it and the woman in it see this link to The Museum of Modern Art.

Next comes another well known image, dating to 1979 and called ‘Sauna’.

Andrew Wyeth - Sauna - 1979

Andrew Wyeth - Sauna - 1979

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Next comes a painting I like because it reminds me of some of the wonderful walks my mom and dad take me and the interlopers on, near Xico, here in Mexico where we live.

Andrew Wyeth - The Intruder - 1971

Andrew Wyeth - The Intruder - 1971

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Next comes a copyrighted image, so it is to view as a bit of art education, but not to be downloaded.  It dates to 1981 and is called “Lovers”

Andrew Wyeth - Lovers - 1981 (copyrighted)

Andrew Wyeth - Lovers - 1981 (copyrighted)

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Next is one I like a lot.  That’s really a lucky dog.  Sometimes I’m lucky like that.  Those are good days.

Andrew Wyeth - Master Bedroom - 1965 (watercolor)

Andrew Wyeth - Master Bedroom - 1965 (watercolor)

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Here is an older picture called “Wind from the Sea” that I like a lot:

Andrew Wyeth - Wind from the Sea - 1948

Andrew Wyeth - Wind from the Sea - 1948

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The next painting is called “Raccoon” but I don’t see any raccoons.  All I see is 2 ½ dogs that probably hunt raccoons.  Maybe the dog that’s only half a dog whose really pulling his chain hard had a raccoon in his mouth, but the canvass just wasn’t big enough to include it.  Seems strange to me but I’m just a dog so maybe you humans who read this can explain it.  Anyway its a pretty nice picture of the dogs that made it all the way in.

Andrew Wyeth - Raccoon - 1958

Andrew Wyeth - Raccoon - 1958

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Last, here is a picture with a wild dog in it.

Andrew Wyeth - Wild Dog (study for groundhog day) - 1959

Andrew Wyeth - Wild Dog (study for groundhog day) - 1959

I bet that was a tough dog to make it through the winter with no chance for a warm bed like that other dog.  The world is not really fair, and lots of it is just luck.

Anyway, I hope you liked this selection from the works of Andrew Wyeth, may he rest in peace.

Yours,

Rita the dog

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More Cold Dogs

January 11, 2009

Those European artists who managed to get out in the cold snow and ice back in the 16-th, 17-th, 18-th and 19-th centuries and capture the scenery, the life of the people, and the austere conditions have my greatest admiration.  Especially because they managed to show dogs quite often.  Maybe even some of my ancestors! Or maybe not.  In any case, today I bring you seven wonderful images, showing Holland, Belgium, and England in the Winter, long ago.

Enjoy, and don’t forget to click on the images  so you can see the details, especially the dogs.

First, “View on the Heergracht at the Amstel”, by Dutch painter, Springer Cornelis (1817-1891)

View on the Heergracht at the Amstel -- Springer Cornelis (1817-1891)

View on the Heergracht at the Amstel -- Springer Cornelis (1817-1891)

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Next,  “On the way to market” by British painter, Thomas Smythe (1825-1906).

On the way to market--Thomas Smythe (1825-1906)

On the way to market--Thomas Smythe (1825-1906)

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Now comes a frozen canal near castle, by Dutch painter, Andreas Schelfhout (1787-1870).

Frozen canal near castle--Andreas Schelfhout (1787-1870)

Frozen canal near castle--Andreas Schelfhout (1787-1870)

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And another winter scene by Belgian painter, Albert Moerman (1808 – 1856).

Winter Landscape--Albert Moerman (1808 - 1856)

Winter Landscape--Albert Moerman (1808 - 1856)

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Here is another scene showing 19th century winter in Holland, by Dutch painter, Bart van Hove (1856-1914).

Pompenburg met Hofpoort in Winter--Bart van Hove (1856-1914)

Pompenburg met Hofpoort in Winter--Bart van Hove (1856-1914)

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Next, a 17th century winter scene by Flemish Baroque era painter, Jan Abrahamsz Beerstraten (ca.1627-1666).  Those dogs look cold.

Post House and the New Bridge--Jan Abrahamsz Beerstraten (ca. 1627-1666)

Post House and the New Bridge--Jan Abrahamsz Beerstraten (ca. 1627-1666)

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Last for today, “Country Folk in a Frozen Winter Landscape”  by Dutch painter, Wouterus Verschuur ( 1812-1874).

Country Folk in a Frozen Winter Landscape--Wouterus Verschuur (1812-1874)

Country Folk in a Frozen Winter Landscape--Wouterus Verschuur (1812-1874)

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Well, I hope you liked them, and clicked on at least a few so to see how cold dogs survived in the tough old days.  To me it looks like it was colder back then.

Your best friend,

Rita the dog.

Cold Dogs

January 4, 2009

There weren’t that many firecrackers and bombs exploding in the air this year.  I crawled under the table as close to my Dad’s feet as possible.  He kept thinking I would knock him off-line because I had to step over the surge protector with the switch on top, but I was careful.  Old dogs are wiser, no New Year’s resolutions for me.  Sure way to feel guilty and bad.  Its cold this time of year, but walks and lying in the sun, when there is sun, helps some.

So I thought you might like to see some art which features cold dogs.  Yeah, I know, this means I’ll have to do hot dogs sometime, to keep things balanced.  Obligations weigh heavy.

Let’s start with a famous one, by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, called “The Hunters in the Snow (Winter)” which dates back to 1565.

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, called "The Hunters in the Snow (Winter)" which dates back to 1565.

Click on image to see it better (and bigger).  I’ll bet those dogs had cold feet.

Next, an ice skating  scene in Holland, dating to the 19th century, by the Dutch landscape artist Andreas Schelfhout, who specialized in winter landscapes.

Andreas Schelfhout (1787-1870) -- Ice Merriment Near a Mill

Andreas Schelfhout (1787-1870) -- Ice Merriment Near a Mill

Click on the image to see those cold merry folks a little larger, and of course, the dog.

Last, a very sad dog standing over the open grave of his one true love–how will he survive now that his mistress has past away?  This is by Swedish artist Carl Stefan Bennet (1800-1878).

Carl Stefan Bennet (1800-1878) -- Fidele

Carl Stefan Bennet (1800-1878) ~ Fidele

Please click image to see it better.  I have many more cold dogs in winter images.  Speak up if you would like to see more.